Making Headlines…

The State of Coal Country Inside Appalachia from West Virginia Public Broadcasting's "Inside Appalachia" Radio Show

Our roots with coal run deep here in central Appalachia. But the future for the people in the Appalachian coalfields is unclear.  Although coal will likely still continue to be mined, it doesn’t seem like jobs in this industry will ever come back, not like they once were. People in the coalfields are worried. Jobs are disappearing -- and there isn’t a lot of hope right now. Click here to listen to the podcast…







Story About "Humans" in NE Tennessee's Loafer Magazine Want to know about Appalachia? Ask an Appalachian!

At a time when it seems there is nothing positive coming out of the mountains of Appalachia, documentary photographer Malcolm J. Wilson is rooting stories and images out of the hills and hollers much like an accomplished ginseng hunter. Wilson launched the Humans of Central Appalachia (HOCA) Facebook page in June, 2015, as a documentary project aimed at presenting honest stories from Appalachia in an effort to quell stereotypes perpetuated about the region by mainstream shock culture photographers. Read more…

 

















WMMT Radio, Whitesburg, Kentucky's Mountain News and World Report…

Doug Naselroad, Hindman, Kentucky

WMMT proudly features the first of what will be an ongoing collaboration with the Humans of Central Appalachia project – an interview with Master Luthier in Residence at the Bolen Woodworking Studio of the Appalachian Artisan Center, Doug Naselroad.  Humans of Central Appalachia (HOCA) was founded on Facebook in 2015 in an effort to dispell the stereotypes perpetuated by mainstream media sources and shock photographers. LISTEN TO THE PODCAST…





Video Story By Jack Dunham, BVU, Bristol, Virginia…

 

 

 

 

 


What Happens When Strangers With Cameras Travel Inside Appalachia?

(West Virginia Public Radio's "Inside Appalachia" Podcast & Syndicated Radio Show)

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What happens when strangers with cameras go to Appalachia? It’s a complicated topic that many Appalachians have strong feelings about. Hearing about recent clashes between outsider photographers and local people, it almost seems as if we’ve been through this before. This show looks at why a recent photo essay that was published in Vice magazine, called “Two Days in Appalachia”, is causing a lot of debate throughout Appalachia. We’ll also hear from artists and photographers who are hoping to cultivate more diversity and civilian artists. LISTEN TO THE PODCAST…


Malcolm Wilson has made it his mission to profile the people of Appalachia…

(WCYB TV 5 News Story, Bristol, TN/VA)

A Bristol, Tennessee photographer started a Facebook page a few weeks ago and in a short time thousands of fans have begun to follow him and his work.  Malcolm Wilson has made it his mission to profile the people of Appalachia.

BRISTOL, Tenn. -  A Bristol, Tennessee photographer started a Facebook page a few weeks ago and in a short time thousands of fans have begun to follow him and his work.  Malcolm Wilson has made it his mission to profile the people of Appalachia. Wilson spends his free time traveling around Central Appalachia, talking to as many people as he can. He's the creator behind the Facebook page, HUMANS OF CENTRAL APPALACHIA, a space to share everyone's experience. WATCH THE VIDEO…


Show It Like You Know It

Malcolm J. Wilson’s unfiltered look at the real Humans of Central Appalachia by Coleman Larkin

(Kentucky for Kentucky Internet Blog; Lexington, KY)

Something about the way photographer Malcolm J. Wilson freezes the light on his subjects, or the way the dark rivulets of, say, the wrinkles in their skin, seem to carry on in fluid motion like shadowy creeks, makes them look as if they’ve been carved from marble a millennium ago. You might not know who they are. You probably don’t. But you get the sense that they’re important. That they matter. And that’s the point. Inspired by the wildly popular Humans of New York, Wilson started a Facebook page of his own, one that tells the unfiltered stories of the real people who live in the often misunderstood area he calls home: Humans of Central AppalachiaIn less than a month he’s garnered around 8,000 followers and spends much of his time crisscrossing the region in search of subjects to keep up with the demand for his mix of honest, objective storytelling and documentary photography. CONTINUE READING…